Work psychology Archives - The Oxford Review - OR Briefings

Category Archives for "Work psychology"

A New Study on the Complex Nature of Microaggressions

Nature of microaggressions

The Nature of microagressions tend to be misunderstood. Even though the concept of microaggressions has been circulating in psychiatry for 4 decades, the term has only recently become popular in mainstream organisational and societal consciousness. Originally, the idea of microaggressions was used to describe the veiled hostility and disdain shown to African Americans by racist […]

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The 5DC dimensions of curiosity and curious people

Curiousity

The old saying the curiosity killed the cat is wrong. It should be curiosity skilled the cat. In this research briefing that was sent to members in 2021 I look at a study that examined the 5 dimensions of curiosity and curious people. Do you recognise yourself?  Curiosity refers to the recognition, pursuit and exploration […]

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How Noise Causes Problems with Our Decision-Making Capability

Organisational Success Podcast

There are many things that interfere with our ability to make good decisions and judgements. In a new book by Daniel Kahneman, Cass Sunstein and Olivier Sibony, noise is identified as having a major negative impact on both our decision-making and judgements. In this fascinating interview, David talks with co-author Professor Olivier Sibony about what noise […]

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How to Moderate Extreme Thinking, Behaviour and Obsessions at Work

Organisational Success Podcast

Extremism, or behaviour and thinking that becomes relentlessly focused on one or a small group of issues, can be seen as both a negative and a positive dependent on the intention and outcome. For example, professional tennis players Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams, artist Henry Matisse, scientist Marie Curie, the Buddhist monk Thích Quảng Đức, who […]

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Hubris: The Effect It Has On Organisations And People

Dennis Toursh

Hubris is frequently forwarded as an explanation for many forms of organisational failure. Hubris is a form of  overconfidence or extreme and inordinate self-confidence, over-optimism, excessive self-esteem, pride as well as arrogance. Hubris as an explanation for organisational failure Studies have found that recourse to hubris as an explanation for organisational failure, particularly in industries like […]

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The Big Problem with Using Personality Instruments for Giving Feedback

Organisational Success Podcast

Using Personality Instruments for Work-Related Feedback Personality instruments, indicators or tests are used in many organisations and by coaches and consultants around the world for giving feedback to employees and executives about work-related performance and for developmental purposes. The idea appears simple. Understanding your personality can give you insights into your performance and how you […]

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Psychological entitlement could be stopping you get promoted

Psychological entitlement

Ever had a promotion turned down? Social norms and a sense of entitlement could be the reason … Ever wondered why you or someone else didn’t get promoted when they should have done? This not uncommon situation, where someone who deserves to be promoted ends up getting blocked, occurs regularly in many organisations and it […]

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Decision-making and self-control – the cost

self-control

Self-control and decision making Do you feel tired or even exhausted after making a lot of decisions or having to make important decisions and choices? It takes self-control and emotion regulation but it also comes at a cost. This could be the reason… Making decisions and choices requires a level of self-control and emotion regulation. […]

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