Work psychology Archives - The Oxford Review - OR Briefings

Category Archives for "Work psychology"

Hubris: The Effect It Has On Organisations And People

Dennis Toursh

Hubris is frequently forwarded as an explanation for many forms of organisational failure. Hubris is a form of  overconfidence or extreme and inordinate self-confidence, over-optimism, excessive self-esteem, pride as well as arrogance. Hubris as an explanation for organisational failure Studies have found that recourse to hubris as an explanation for organisational failure, particularly in industries like […]

Read more

The Big Problem with Using Personality Instruments for Giving Feedback

Organisational Success Podcast

Using Personality Instruments for Work-Related Feedback Personality instruments, indicators or tests are used in many organisations and by coaches and consultants around the world for giving feedback to employees and executives about work-related performance and for developmental purposes. The idea appears simple. Understanding your personality can give you insights into your performance and how you […]

Read more

Psychological entitlement could be stopping you get promoted

Psychological entitlement

Ever had a promotion turned down? Social norms and a sense of entitlement could be the reason … Ever wondered why you or someone else didn’t get promoted when they should have done? This not uncommon situation, where someone who deserves to be promoted ends up getting blocked, occurs regularly in many organisations and it […]

Read more

Decision-making and self-control – the cost

self-control

Self-control and decision making Do you feel tired or even exhausted after making a lot of decisions or having to make important decisions and choices? It takes self-control and emotion regulation but it also comes at a cost. This could be the reason… Making decisions and choices requires a level of self-control and emotion regulation. […]

Read more

Why an expert produces more, with less effort and thinking – new study

Expertise

There is a central paradox at the heart of expertise: experts consistently perform better than novices, whilst at the same time they engage in less thinking and energy than novices. A core question that has intrigued psychologists for years is how can less thinking and cognitive processing produce better performance? The standard understanding about this […]

Read more

Just how valid is the idea of emotional intelligence?

EQ emotional intelligence

As mentioned in a previous blogs, interest in emotional intelligence is a relatively recent phenomenon. With the exception of a small blip of interest at the end of the Second World War, emotional intelligence has only really come to prominence in terms of research since the 1990s.     Emotional intelligence, however, isn’t one construct, […]

Read more

How our cognitive outlook and perceptions affect our well-being – new study

cognitive outlook and perceptions

Our cognitive outlook and perceptions, or how we construe things, can have a significant impact on a range of outcomes. For example, people with a generally positive outlook tend to have higher satisfaction ratings for things like relationships, family, job etc. Additionally, as you would expect, people with a more positive take on things tend […]

Read more

Time banditry: How to get away with wasting time at work – new research

Time Banditry

Some people just appear to have the knack of doing very little or wasting time at work and getting away with it! When I was a police officer we had a sergeant who was nicknamed ‘Blister’ as he had a reliable tendency to turn up after the real work had been done. A new study looking at […]

Read more
>