The Oxford Review DEI (Diversity, Equity and Inclusion) Dictionary
  • Home /

The Oxford Review DEI (Diversity, Equity and Inclusion) Dictionary

Oxford Review Dictionary of DEI (Diversity, Equity and Inclusion)

The is a comprehensive and growing dictionary / encyclopaedia of definitions and explanations of terms used in DEI (Diversity, Equity and Inclusion). Within the DEI dictionary you can click on any term for a fuller explanation.

Contents

A

  • Ableism – Discrimination and social prejudice against people with disabilities.
  • Ableism Awareness – Recognising and challenging discrimination or prejudice against people with disabilities.
  • Ableism in Society – The societal practices and beliefs that devalue and discriminate against people with disabilities.
  • Ableist Language – Language that is offensive to people with disability, an important consideration in creating inclusive communication practices.
  • Ability-Centric Language – Language that prioritises abilities, which can unintentionally marginalise those with disabilities.
  • Acceptance vs. Tolerance – Differentiating between fully accepting diverse individuals as they are (acceptance) versus merely tolerating their presence (tolerance).
  • Access to Capital – The availability of financial resources, often a barrier for underrepresented entrepreneurs and communities.
  • Access to Advancement – Ensuring that individuals from all backgrounds have equitable opportunities for professional growth and development.
  • Access to Education – Ensuring that people from all backgrounds have equal opportunities to receive quality education.
  • Access to Healthcare – Addressing disparities in healthcare availability and quality among different populations, an important equity issue.
  • Access to Resources – Ensuring equitable availability and distribution of resources to all groups, especially those historically marginalized.
  • Accessibility – Refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people who experience disabilities.
  • Accessibility in Design – The practice of designing products, environments, and digital content that are accessible to all users, including those with disabilities.
  • Accessible Digital Content – Creating online materials that are easily accessible to people with different abilities, including those with visual, auditory, or cognitive impairments.
  • Accessibility in Education – Ensuring that educational materials, environments, and practices are accessible to all students, including those with disabilities.
  • Accessibility Standards Compliance – Adhering to established guidelines and standards to ensure accessibility for individuals with disabilities.
  • Accessibility in Urban Planning – Incorporating inclusive design principles in urban development to ensure accessibility for all citizens.
  • Accessible Communication – Ensuring that communication methods are inclusive and can be understood by people with diverse abilities, including those with hearing, visual, or cognitive impairments.
  • Accessible Information Technology – Designing and implementing technology solutions that are accessible to people with a wide range of abilities and disabilities.
  • Accessibility Initiatives – Programs or projects aimed at enhancing accessibility for people with disabilities in public spaces, workplaces, and digital environments.
  • Accessibility Guidelines – Standards and recommendations to ensure services, products, and environments are accessible to people with disabilities.
  • Accessibility in Public Spaces – Designing public spaces and amenities to be usable by all people, regardless of their physical abilities.
  • Accommodation – Adjustments or modifications made to environments, systems, or practices to support individuals with differing needs.
  • Accommodation of Learning Styles – Adapting teaching methods to cater to different learning preferences, an important aspect of inclusive education.
  • Accommodation vs. Assimilation – Differentiating between making adjustments to include a diverse group (accommodation) and expecting a diverse group to conform to dominant norms (assimilation).
  • Acculturation – The process of cultural change and psychological change that results following meeting between cultures.
  • Actionable Diversity Goals – Specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound objectives set to improve diversity and inclusion.
  • Accountability in Diversity Initiatives – Holding individuals and organizations responsible for their actions and commitments related to diversity and inclusion.
  • Acknowledging Diversity Milestones – Recognising and celebrating significant achievements or events related to diversity and inclusion.
  • Acknowledgment of Historical Injustices – Recognising and addressing past wrongs and injustices that have impacted marginalised groups.
  • Acknowledgement of Intersectional Identities – Recognising and valuing the complex, overlapping aspects of people’s social identities (such as race, gender, sexuality, and class).
  • Acknowledgment of Land – Recognising the traditional indigenous inhabitants of the land, a practice important in respecting historical truths and indigenous cultures.
  • Acknowledging Privilege – Recognising and understanding the advantages that certain groups have due to systemic inequalities in society.
  • Acknowledging Unconscious Bias – Recognising that everyone has unconscious biases that can affect their perceptions and actions.
  • Activism – The policy or action of using vigorous campaigning to bring about political or social change, often integral in advancing DEI initiatives.
  • Adaptability – The ability to adjust to new conditions, a crucial skill in diverse and rapidly changing environments.
  • Adaptive Inclusivity – The ability of systems, policies, and practices to evolve and adapt in response to the changing needs of a diverse population.
  • Adaptive Decision-Making – The ability to make decisions that are responsive to the diverse needs and situations of different groups.
  • Adaptive Leadership in DEI – Leadership that responds flexibly and effectively to the challenges and opportunities presented by a diverse workforce and society.
  • Adaptive Learning Models – Educational models that adjust to the varying needs and abilities of diverse learners.
  • Adaptive Organisational Culture – A culture within an organisation that is flexible and responsive to the diverse needs of its members.
  • Adaptive Policy-Making – Creating policies that are flexible and responsive to the changing needs of a diverse society.
  • Advantage – A condition or circumstance that puts one in a favorable or superior position, often discussed in the context of privilege and systemic inequalities.
  • Advancement of Inclusive Policies – The development and implementation of policies that promote inclusivity and equity in various sectors.
  • Advancement of Minorities – Efforts and policies aimed at promoting the progression and success of minority groups in various sectors.
  • Adversity Quotient – A measure of an individual’s ability to thrive in challenging circumstances, relevant in discussions about resilience in diverse populations.
  • Adverse Environment – An environment that is hostile or unwelcoming to certain groups, which can impede diversity and inclusion efforts.
  • Advocacy – Active support or argument for a cause or policy, especially in the context of promoting DEI.
  • Advocacy for Accessibility – Actively supporting and promoting accessibility in various environments, crucial for inclusivity of individuals with disabilities.
  • Advocacy in Diversity – The act of supporting and promoting diversity in various spheres such as the workplace, education, and community settings.
  • Advocacy for Equal Rights – Actively supporting and promoting the equal rights of all individuals, regardless of their background or identity.
  • Advocacy for Inclusivity – Actively promoting and supporting inclusivity in various aspects of society, including workplaces, education, and policy.
  • Aesthetic Inclusivity – Including diverse artistic and cultural expressions in the arts and media.
  • Affective Commitment – The emotional attachment, identification, and involvement that an employee has with its organization, critical in understanding employee engagement in diverse workplaces.
  • Affective Inclusivity Training – Training that focuses on the emotional aspects of inclusion, such as empathy and emotional intelligence.
  • Affinity-Based Mentoring – Mentoring relationships based on shared identities or experiences, which can be particularly supportive for individuals in underrepresented groups.
  • Affinity Bias – The tendency to warm up to people like ourselves, a significant factor in discussions about unconscious bias and diversity in the workplace.
  • Affinity Bias Awareness – Recognising the tendency to favour individuals who share similar backgrounds, experiences, or characteristics with oneself.
  • Affinity Group Support – Providing support and resources to groups formed around shared identities or interests, often within larger organisations.
  • Affinity Networking – Networking within groups based on shared interests, backgrounds, or identities, often used in professional contexts to support underrepresented groups.
  • Affirmation of Identities – Validating and respecting the diverse identities of individuals, an essential practice in inclusive environments.
  • Affirmative Action – A policy favouring those who tend to suffer from discrimination, especially in relation to employment or education.
  • Affirmative Action Planning – Strategies and actions taken to increase representation and opportunities for historically underrepresented groups.
  • Affirmative Narrative Building – Creating and promoting narratives that positively affirm the identities and experiences of marginalised groups.
  • Age Diversity Awareness – Recognition of the value and importance of having a range of ages represented in various contexts, from the workplace to community initiatives.
  • Age-Inclusive Policies – Policies that take into account the needs and perspectives of people of all ages, avoiding age-based discrimination.
  • Aging Workforce Considerations – Acknowledging and addressing the specific needs and contributions of an aging workforce in DEI strategies.
  • Agender – Identifying as having no gender or being gender-neutral, a concept relevant in discussions about gender identity.
  • Agency in Diversity Initiatives – Empowering individuals, especially those from marginalised groups, to take active roles in shaping diversity and inclusion efforts.
  • Agency in Representation – Empowering individuals, especially from marginalised groups, to have control over how they are represented and perceived.
  • Agency in Social Justice – The capacity and empowerment of individuals and groups to act towards achieving equitable social change.
  • Ageism – Prejudice or discrimination on the grounds of a person’s age.
  • Ageism Awareness – Recognising and addressing age-related prejudices and stereotypes, particularly in the workplace and media.
  • Age-Inclusive Design – Designing products, services, and environments that are suitable and accessible for people of all ages.
  • Age-Related Inclusion – Ensuring inclusivity across different age groups, addressing the unique needs and contributions of each age cohort.
  • Agency – The capacity of individuals to act independently and make their own free choices, an important concept in empowering diverse groups.
  • Agency and Advocacy – The capability and action of individuals or groups to represent and support themselves or others, particularly in marginalised communities.
  • Alignment of DEI Goals – Ensuring that diversity, equity, and inclusion objectives are consistent with and integrated into the broader goals of an organisation.
  • Altruism – The belief in or practice of disinterested and selfless concern for the well-being of others, which can be a driving force in DEI efforts.
  • Allophilia – Having a positive attitude towards outgroup members, an important concept in fostering positive intergroup relations.
  • Ally – An individual who actively supports and stands up for the rights and dignity of groups other than their own, particularly in the context of social justice and DEI initiatives.
  • Ally Behaviour Training – Training aimed at teaching individuals how to effectively support and advocate for marginalised or underrepresented groups.
  • Ally Education – Educating individuals about how they can effectively support and advocate for marginalised groups.
  • Allyship – The practice of emphasising social justice, inclusion, and human rights by members of an advantaged group, to advance the interests of an oppressed or marginalised group.
  • Allyship Accountability – The responsibility of allies to remain informed, active, and responsive in their support for marginalised groups.
  • Allyship in Action – Practical steps taken by individuals to support and advocate for marginalised groups.
  • Allyship Commitment – The ongoing dedication to understanding, empathising with, and actively supporting marginalised groups.
  • Allyship in Practice – The practical application of supporting and standing in solidarity with marginalised groups.
  • Alternative Narratives – Promoting stories and perspectives that challenge dominant cultural narratives, important for diversity in media and literature.
  • Ambient Belonging – The sense that an environment is welcoming and inclusive, often conveyed through subtle cues and atmosphere.
  • Ambiguity Tolerance – The ability to perceive ambiguous situations as desirable, important in DEI for managing diversity and complexity in organisational settings.
  • Ancestry – The familial lineage or ethnic background of an individual, often a factor in discussions of diversity and cultural identity.
  • Analytical Approaches to DEI – Using data-driven and analytical methods to understand and address issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Anchoring Inclusion – Establishing inclusion as a fundamental and unmovable principle within an organisation or community.
  • Androgyny – The combination of masculine and feminine characteristics, relevant in discussions about gender identity and expression.
  • Anomie – A condition of instability resulting from a breakdown of standards and values or from a lack of purpose or ideals, often discussed in the context of societal change and diversity.
  • Anti-Bias Curriculum – Educational content designed to counteract biases and stereotypes, fostering an inclusive learning environment.
  • Anti-discrimination – Actions or policies designed to eliminate discrimination against people based on race, sex, age, disability, etc., a fundamental aspect of DEI initiatives.
  • Anti-Discrimination Enforcement – The active implementation and reinforcement of policies that prevent discrimination in various settings.
  • Anti-Discriminatory Legislation – Laws and regulations designed to prevent and penalise discrimination based on factors such as race, gender, age, and disability.
  • Anti-Oppression Training – Training programs designed to help individuals and organisations understand and combat systemic oppression in society.
  • Anti-Oppressive Practice – A practice in social work and education that focuses on ending socioeconomic oppression.
  • Anti-Prejudice Education – Education aimed at reducing prejudices and promoting understanding among diverse groups.
  • Anti-Racism – The policy or practice of opposing racism and promoting racial tolerance.
  • Anti-Racism Strategies – Specific approaches and actions aimed at combating racism and promoting racial equity.
  • Anti-Racist Activism – Active involvement in movements and actions that seek to confront and eliminate racism.
  • Anti-Racist Policies – Policies explicitly designed to combat racism and promote racial equity within organisations and institutions.
  • Anti-Subordination Theory – A framework in legal theory and civil rights that focuses on addressing the conditions that perpetuate subordination based on race, gender, and other identities.
  • Apartheid – A policy or system of segregation or discrimination on grounds of race, relevant in discussions of historical and systemic inequalities.
  • Appreciation of Diversity in Thought – Valuing and encouraging diverse perspectives and ways of thinking in collaborative environments.
  • Appreciation of Multiculturalism – Valuing and embracing the diversity of cultures within a community or organisation.
  • Appreciative Diversity Training – Training that focuses on recognising and valuing the positive aspects of diversity in a team or organisation.
  • Appreciation of Individual Differences – Valuing the unique qualities and characteristics each person brings to a group or community.
  • Appropriation – Cultural appropriation, the adoption of elements of one culture by members of another culture, often discussed in DEI in terms of power dynamics.
  • Artistic Representation Diversity – Ensuring diverse representation in the arts, including visual arts, literature, film, and music, to reflect a variety of perspectives and experiences.
  • Asexual – Having no sexual attraction to others, or low or absent interest in sexual activity, an important aspect of understanding sexual diversity.
  • Ascribed Status – A social position a person is given at birth or assumes involuntarily later in life, an important concept in understanding social stratification and its impact on diversity and equity.
  • Aspirational Role Modelling – Serving as a role model to inspire others, particularly from underrepresented groups, to aspire to greater achievements.
  • Aspirations for Inclusive Excellence – Striving to achieve the highest standards in inclusivity across all areas of an organisation or community.
  • Assessment for Inclusion – Evaluating policies, practices, and environments to ensure they are inclusive and meet the needs of diverse groups.
  • Asset-Based Community Development – An approach that focuses on the strengths and potentials of a community, including in diverse and marginalised groups.
  • Assimilation – The process by which a person or a group’s language and/or culture come to resemble those of another group.
  • Assimilation Critique – The evaluation and criticism of the process of assimilating minority groups into dominant cultures, often at the cost of losing cultural identities.
  • Assimilation Policy – A policy encouraging immigrants or minorities to adopt the dominant culture, often debated in the context of multiculturalism and diversity policies.
  • Assimilationist – A policy or practice that encourages minority cultures to dissolve and adopt the dominant culture.
  • Assumed Competence – The presumption that individuals, particularly those from marginalized groups, are competent and capable, counteracting stereotypes that suggest otherwise.
  • Assumption – A thing that is accepted as true or as certain to happen, without proof, often leading to biases and stereotypes in social contexts.
  • Assumptions About Culture – Preconceived notions or stereotypes about different cultures, which can hinder intercultural understanding and inclusion.
  • Asylum Seekers – People who have fled their home country and seek sanctuary in another, highlighting issues of global diversity and humanitarian response.
  • Asymmetrical Information Flow – The unequal access to information, which can affect marginalised groups disproportionately.
  • Asymmetrical Power Relations – Situations where power is distributed unequally among groups or individuals, a critical concept in understanding systemic inequities and social dynamics.
  • Atmosphere of Inclusivity – Creating an environment where all individuals feel valued, respected, and included.
  • Attribution Bias – The systematic errors made when people evaluate or try to find reasons for their own and others’ behaviours, often influencing perceptions in a diverse environment.
  • Attribution Error in Diversity – Misattributing behaviors or outcomes to a person’s group identity rather than to individual factors or situational contexts.
  • Atypical – Not representative of a type, group, or class, a term relevant in discussions about neurodiversity and challenging stereotypes.
  • Audience Diversification – Efforts to reach and include a diverse range of individuals in media, events, and communications.
  • Audience Inclusivity – Ensuring that diverse groups are considered and included in media, events, and communications.
  • Audism – The notion that life without hearing is futile and miserable, that hearing people are superior, or that deaf people should strive to be as much like hearing people as possible.
  • Auditory Processing Disorder – Difficulty in processing auditory information, a specific aspect of neurodiversity, important in creating inclusive environments for people with different learning and processing styles.
  • Authentic Consultation – Engaging with diverse groups in a genuine and respectful manner to inform decisions and policies.
  • Authentic Cultural Expressions – Encouraging and respecting genuine expressions of cultural identity in various forms, such as art, language, and traditions.
  • Authentic Identity – The genuine representation of one’s personal identity, significant in discussions about personal expression and diversity.
  • Authentic Inclusion Measures – Genuine and meaningful actions taken to ensure diverse groups are included and represented in all aspects of an organisation or community.
  • Authentic Intercultural Interactions – Genuine and respectful exchanges between individuals from different cultural backgrounds.
  • Authentic Inclusion Efforts – Genuine and sincere efforts to include diverse groups, as opposed to superficial or tokenistic actions.
  • Authentic Diverse Narratives – True and genuine stories from diverse perspectives, challenging single-story narratives and stereotypes.
  • Authentic Leadership – A leadership style that emphasizes the authenticity of leaders and their relationships with followers, relevant in the context of ethical and inclusive leadership in organisations.
  • Authentic Voice – The genuine expression of individuals from diverse backgrounds, free from the pressure to conform to dominant norms.
  • Authenticity – The quality of being authentic or genuine, which can be crucial in creating an inclusive environment where people feel valued for their true selves.
  • Authenticity in DEI Conversations – Encouraging genuine and open discussions about diversity, equity, and inclusion, without resorting to tokenism or superficial engagement.
  • Authenticity in Representation – Ensuring that diverse groups are represented in a manner that is true to their experiences and identities.
  • Autonomy – The right or condition of self-government, particularly in the context of empowering marginalised or minority groups within society or organisations.
  • Awareness – Knowledge or perception of a situation or fact, particularly relating to issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Awareness of Intersectionality – Understanding how different aspects of a person’s identity (e.g., race, gender, class) intersect and create unique experiences of discrimination or privilege.
  • Awareness Training – Training programs designed to increase employees’ awareness of diversity and inclusion issues, aiming to foster a more inclusive workplace culture.
  • Aversion – A strong dislike or disinclination, often used in discussions of unconscious bias and aversive racism.
  • Axiology – The philosophical study of value, which includes considerations of ethics and aesthetics, relevant to understanding value systems in diverse cultures.

B

  • BAME (Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic) – A term used in the UK to refer to Black, Asian, and minority ethnic people.
  • BAME Leadership Representation – The presence and visibility of Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic individuals in leadership positions within organisations. 
  • Behavioural Inclusivity – The practices and actions that individuals and organisations undertake to ensure that all members feel valued, respected, and supported.
  • Belief Systems – The collective beliefs held by an individual or group.
  • Belief System Dynamics – The study of how individual and collective beliefs, values, and assumptions evolve and influence behaviour and interactions within diverse groups.
  • Belonging – The feeling of security and support when there is a sense of acceptance, inclusion, and identity for a member of a certain group or place.
  • Benevolent Prejudice – A form of prejudice that appears positive or complimentary but is actually patronising and reinforces stereotypes and unequal power dynamics.
  • Benevolent Sexism – A form of sexism that is couched in terms that seem positive or affectionate but actually reinforce traditional gender roles and the notion of women’s dependency on men.
  • Bias – Inclination or prejudice for or against one person or group, especially in a way considered to be unfair.
  • Bias Accountability – The practice of holding individuals and organizations responsible for addressing and mitigating bias in their actions, policies, and processes.
  • Bias Awareness – The understanding and acknowledgment of one’s own biases and their potential impact on decision-making and interactions with others.
  • Bias Correction – The process of identifying and adjusting for bias in decision-making processes, data analysis, and AI algorithms to ensure fairness and equity.
  • Bias Detection and Management – The process of identifying, assessing, and mitigating biases in organisational practices, decision-making, and interpersonal interactions.
  • Bias-Free Language – Language that avoids biases, stereotypes, or expressions that discriminate against groups of people based on race, gender, socioeconomic status, and other characteristics.
  • Bias Incident – A discriminatory act or behavior motivated by prejudice against a person’s identity, such as race, gender, or sexual orientation.
  • Bias Incident Reporting – A system or process for individuals to report incidents of bias, discrimination, or harassment within an organisation.
  • Bias Interruption – The act of recognising and intervening when bias is observed in decision-making processes, conversations, or actions.
  • Bias Interrupters – Evidence-based organisational processes designed to identify and mitigate unconscious biases in the workplace.
  • Bias in Performance Evaluation – The influence of unconscious or conscious biases on the assessment of employees’ performance.
  • Bias Mitigation – Strategies and techniques employed to reduce or eliminate the impact of bias in decision-making processes and systems.
  • Bias Mitigation Tools – Software, algorithms, or processes designed to identify and reduce bias in various systems, such as hiring platforms or performance evaluations.
  • Bias Reduction Strategies – Techniques and approaches designed to minimize the influence of bias in various contexts, such as hiring, performance evaluations, and team dynamics.
  • Bias Response Team – A group of individuals responsible for addressing and resolving reported incidents of bias or discrimination within an institution.
  • Bias Training – Training programs designed to help individuals recognise and mitigate their own unconscious biases.
  • Biased Systemic Structures – Institutional and structural mechanisms that perpetuate inequalities and biases, often unconsciously, through policies, practices, and cultural norms.
  • Bicultural Competence – The ability to effectively navigate and integrate two or more cultures, often developed by individuals who have been exposed to and have adapted to different cultural environments.
  • Bicultural Identity – The condition of identifying with two cultures simultaneously.
  • Bi-cultural Identity Development – The process by which individuals navigate and integrate their dual cultural identities to form a cohesive sense of self.
  • Bicultural Identity Integration – The degree to which an individual is able to harmoniously combine and express their dual cultural identities.
  • Bicultural Leadership – Leadership approaches that draw upon the strengths and perspectives of individuals with dual cultural identities to foster inclusivity and innovation.
  • Bi-cultural Stress – The psychological strain experienced by individuals navigating between two distinct cultural identities or environments.
  • Bi-cultural Stress Management – Methods and resources to help individuals cope with the unique challenges and pressures of navigating multiple cultural identities.
  • Biculturalism – The presence of two different cultures in the same country or region, or the ability of individuals to navigate and incorporate aspects of both their native and host cultures into their lives.
  • Bi-Erasure – The tendency to ignore, remove, falsify, or reexplain evidence of bisexuality in history, academia, the media, and other primary sources.
  • Bi-Invisibility – The lack of acknowledgment and ignoring of the clear evidence that bisexuality exists.
  • Bi-gender – An individual who identifies with two distinct gender identities, either simultaneously or alternating between them.
  • Binary Gender – The classification of gender into two distinct, opposite forms of masculine and feminine, whether by social system or cultural belief.
  • Bilateral Allyship – The reciprocal support and advocacy between different marginalized communities, recognizing their shared struggles and working together towards equity.
  • Binary Thinking – The tendency to think in extremes and categorise things in an either/or fashion, such as male/female, good/bad, or black/white.
  • Biological Determinism – The belief that human behavior and characteristics are primarily determined by genetic factors, often used to justify discrimination.
  • Biological Essentialism – The belief that certain traits, abilities, or characteristics are inherently determined by one’s biology, often used to perpetuate stereotypes and discrimination.
  • BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour) – A term used to acknowledge the unique struggles faced by Black and Indigenous people and other people of colour, particularly in contexts of racism, colonialism, and marginalisation.
  • Bi-phobia – Prejudice, fear, or hatred directed toward bisexual people.
  • Biphobia Allyship – The active support and advocacy for bisexual individuals, working to combat biphobia and promote understanding and acceptance.
  • Biracial – A person whose parents are of two different designated racial groups.
  • Biracial Mental Health – The unique mental health experiences and needs of biracial individuals, and the importance of culturally responsive mental health support.
  • Birth Assigned Sex – The sex assigned to an individual at birth based on their external anatomy, which may differ from their gender identity.
  • Bisexual – A person emotionally, romantically, or sexually attracted to more than one sex, gender, or gender identity though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree.
  • Black Asexuality Inclusion – The recognition and inclusion of Black individuals who identify as asexual within both the Black and LGBTQ+ communities.
  • Black Deaf Culture – The distinct cultural identity and experiences of Black individuals who are part of the Deaf community.
  • Black Disability Justice – The intersection of racial justice and disability rights, advocating for the inclusion and empowerment of Black individuals with disabilities.
  • Black Empowerment – Initiatives and movements aimed at promoting the social, economic, and political power of Black individuals and communities.
  • Black Feminism – A philosophical and activist movement that addresses the intersection of race, gender, and class in the experiences of Black women.
  • Black LGBTQ+ Inclusion – Initiatives and efforts to ensure the full inclusion and representation of Black individuals within the LGBTQ+ community and beyond.
  • Black Lives Matter – A decentralised movement advocating for non-violent civil disobedience in protest against incidents of police brutality and all racially motivated violence against Black people.
  • Black Masculinity – The social and cultural constructs surrounding the identity and expectations of Black men.
  • Black Mental Health – The unique mental health experiences and needs of Black individuals, as well as the importance of culturally responsive mental health support.
  • Black Neurodivergence – The unique experiences and perspectives of Black individuals who are neurodivergent, and the importance of their inclusion in both racial justice and neurodiversity movements.
  • Black Sign Language – The unique linguistic and cultural characteristics of sign language used within Black Deaf communities.
  • Blind Auditions – A practice originally used in orchestras where musicians perform behind a screen to conceal their identity, thus reducing bias in selection processes.
  • Blind Recruitment – A hiring process that removes personally identifiable information from job applications to reduce potential bias.
  • Blindness Inclusion – Practices and accommodations that ensure the full participation and inclusion of individuals with visual impairments in various settings.
  • Board Diversity – Refers to the inclusion of individuals from a variety of backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives in the governance bodies of organisations.
  • Body Diversity – Recognition and acceptance of the natural diversity in human body shapes, sizes, and abilities.
  • Body Diversity Education – Programs and resources designed to promote understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of diverse body types and appearances.
  • Body Diversity Representation – The inclusion and positive portrayal of a wide range of body types, sizes, and appearances in media, marketing, and other visual representations.
  • Body Inclusivity Training – Educational programs that promote understanding and acceptance of diverse body types and abilities in various settings, such as workplaces or schools.
  • Body Liberation – The movement to free individuals from societal pressures and discrimination based on their physical appearance, promoting body autonomy and self-acceptance.
  • Body Neutrality – The concept of accepting one’s body as it is, focusing on its functionality rather than appearance, and challenging societal beauty standards.
  • Body Positivity – A social movement that promotes acceptance and appreciation of all body types, sizes, and appearances.
  • Brave Space – An inclusive environment that encourages open dialogue, learning, and growth while acknowledging discomfort and challenges.
  • Braille Accessibility – The practice of providing materials and signage in braille to ensure accessibility for individuals with visual impairments.
  • Braille Literacy – The ability to read and write using the braille system, and the importance of promoting braille literacy for individuals with visual impairments.
  • Braille Technology – Assistive devices and software that enable individuals with visual impairments to access information and communicate using braille.
  • Braille Universal Design – The practice of creating physical and digital environments that are inherently accessible to individuals with visual impairments through the incorporation of braille.
  • Brain Diversity The recognition and acceptance of neurological differences, such as autism, ADHD, and dyslexia, as natural variations in human cognition.
  • Breast-feeding Accommodations – Policies, facilities, and support systems that enable breast-feeding individuals to comfortably and efficiently express milk in various settings.
  • Breast-feeding Allyship – The active support and advocacy for breast-feeding individuals, promoting understanding and accommodations in various settings.
  • Breast-feeding Allyship in the Workplace – The active support and advocacy for breast-feeding employees, promoting policies and practices that enable them to balance work and breast-feeding responsibilities.
  • Breast-feeding Inclusion – Policies and practices that support and accommodate the needs of breast-feeding employees in the workplace.
  • Breast-feeding Inclusion Strategies – Proactive approaches to create a supportive and inclusive environment for breast-feeding individuals in the workplace and other settings.
  • Breast-feeding Discrimination – The unfair treatment or disadvantage experienced by individuals due to their breast-feeding status or needs.
  • Bridging and Bonding Social Capital – Concepts that describe the value of social networks.
  • Bridging Social Capital – The development of connections and networks between individuals or groups who are dissimilar in terms of social identity, such as race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status.
  • Buddy System – A supportive arrangement where individuals are paired to provide mutual assistance, guidance, and accountability in fostering inclusion.
  • Building Allyship – The process of actively developing and strengthening one’s role as an ally to marginalized communities through ongoing learning, support, and advocacy.
  • Building Inclusive Cultures – The process of creating workplace environments that recognise, appreciate, and effectively utilise the talents, skills, and perspectives of every employee, regardless of their background or identity.
  • Building Inclusive Leadership – The process of developing leadership skills and practices that foster a sense of belonging, equity, and respect for all individuals within an organization.
  • Building Cultural Humility – The ongoing process of self-reflection and learning to understand and respect the diverse experiences and perspectives of others.
  • Bullying – Repeated, unwanted harmful behaviour towards an individual or group, often manifesting as physical, verbal, or social harm.
  • Burnout Disparity – The disproportionate impact of work-related stress and exhaustion on marginalized groups due to additional challenges and barriers faced.
  • Burnout Prevention Equity – The equitable distribution of resources, support, and strategies to prevent burnout among employees, particularly those from marginalized backgrounds.
  • Bystander Accountability – The expectation that individuals who witness instances of bias, discrimination, or harassment will take action to intervene and report, and the support systems in place to protect and empower these bystanders.
  • Bystander Apathy A social psychological phenomenon where individuals are less likely to help a victim when other people are present, often due to the diffusion of responsibility.
  • Bystander Empowerment Training – Programs that equip individuals with the skills and confidence to safely and effectively intervene in situations of bias, discrimination, or harassment.
  • Bystander Intervention – The act of stepping in to assist someone who is in a situation where they are being discriminated against or harassed.
  • Bystanderism Reduction – Efforts to encourage and empower individuals to actively intervene and disrupt instances of bias, discrimination, or harassment as bystanders.

C

  • Caucus – A meeting of people from a shared identity group to discuss issues and strategies related to their experiences.
  • Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) – An executive-level position responsible for developing and implementing an organisation’s diversity, equity, and inclusion strategies and initiatives.
  • Cisgender – A term used to describe individuals whose gender identity aligns with the sex they were assigned at birth.
  • Cisnormativity – The assumption that all individuals are cisgender and that being cisgender is the norm, which can lead to the marginalisation of transgender and non-binary individuals.
  • Cissexism – Discrimination or prejudice against transgender or non-binary individuals based on the belief that cisgender identities are superior or more valid.
  • Clapback – A quick, sharp, and often witty response to criticism or an offensive statement, particularly in defence of oneself or others.
  • Classism – Prejudice or discrimination based on social or economic class.
  • Closed captioning – Text displayed on a screen that provides a transcript of the audio portion of a video, primarily for those who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Code meshing – The practice of combining different languages, dialects, or communication styles in speaking or writing to express oneself authentically and effectively.
  • Coercion – The use of force, threats, or intimidation to persuade someone to do something against their will.
  • Codeswitching – The practice of alternating between two or more languages, dialects, or communication styles depending on the social context or audience.
  • Cognitive bias – Systematic errors in thinking that can lead to irrational judgements and decisions.
  • Cognitive diversity – The inclusion of people with different thinking styles, problem-solving approaches, and perspectives within a group or organisation.
  • Collective responsibility – The idea that all members of a community or society have a shared obligation to work towards creating a more equitable, just, and inclusive environment.
  • Colour-blind approach – The misguided belief that ignoring or overlooking racial and ethnic differences promotes racial equality, when in reality it can perpetuate systemic inequalities.
  • Colour-brave – Being willing to have open and honest conversations about race and ethnicity to address disparities and promote equity.
  • Colorism – Discrimination based on skin colour, often favouring lighter skin tones over darker ones within the same racial or ethnic group.
  • Comfortable being uncomfortable – Embracing the discomfort that often comes with discussing and addressing difficult topics like racism, discrimination, and inequity.
  • Coming out – The process by which an individual acknowledges and shares their sexual orientation or gender identity with others.
  • Confirmation bias – The tendency to seek out, interpret, and remember information in a way that confirms one’s preexisting beliefs or biases.
  • Conformity – Changing one’s behaviour, attitudes, or beliefs to match those of a group or social norm.
  • Confronting bias – Challenging and addressing biased attitudes, behaviours, and practices when they occur.
  • Consent – Giving permission for something to happen or agreeing to do something freely and without coercion.
  • Contextual intelligence – The ability to understand and adapt to the cultural, social, and political contexts in which one operates, and to make decisions and take actions that are appropriate and effective within those contexts.
  • Cosmopolitanism – A philosophical and cultural perspective that emphasises the interconnectedness of all human beings, regardless of their national, ethnic, or cultural backgrounds, and advocates for openness, tolerance, and global cooperation.
  • Covering – The act of downplaying or hiding aspects of one’s identity to fit in with dominant cultural norms or expectations.
  • Colourism – A form of discrimination based on skin colour, often within the same racial or ethnic group, with a preference for lighter skin tones.
  • Competitive advantage – The benefits gained by organisations that prioritise diversity, equity, and inclusion, such as increased innovation, better decision-making, and improved financial performance.
  • Conscious inclusion – The intentional effort to create an environment where all individuals feel valued, respected, and able to fully contribute their talents and perspectives.
  • Cronyism – Showing favouritism towards friends and associates, often in business or political contexts, without regard for their qualifications.
  • Cross-cultural competence – The ability to effectively interact, communicate, and collaborate with individuals from different cultures and backgrounds.
  • Cultivating belonging – Fostering an inclusive culture where all individuals feel accepted, supported, and connected within a group or organisation.
  • Cultural agility – The ability to quickly adapt and work effectively in different cultural contexts and with people from diverse backgrounds.
  • Cultural appreciation – Respectfully learning about, understanding, and valuing the customs, traditions, and practices of a culture different from one’s own.
  • Cultural appropriation – The adoption or use of elements from a marginalised culture by members of a dominant culture without proper understanding, acknowledgement, or respect.
  • Cultural assimilation – The process by which individuals or groups from one culture adopt the practices, customs, and values of another, often dominant, culture.
  • Cultural audit – A systematic review of an organisation’s policies, practices, and procedures to assess its level of cultural competence and identify areas for improvement in terms of diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Cultural awareness – The understanding of the differences between oneself and people from other countries, cultures, or backgrounds, especially differences in attitudes and values.
  • Cultural bias – The tendency to interpret and judge behaviours, values, and beliefs through the lens of one’s own culture, leading to misunderstandings or prejudice.
  • Cultural broker – An individual who acts as a bridge between different cultural groups, helping to facilitate communication and understanding.
  • Cultural competence – The ability to understand, appreciate, and interact effectively with people from diverse cultures and backgrounds.
  • Cultural conflict – Disagreements or clashes that arise when different cultural values, beliefs, or practices come into contact with one another.
  • Cultural determinism – The belief that an individual’s behaviour, values, and beliefs are primarily determined by their cultural background, rather than individual agency or other factors.
  • Cultural diversity – The existence of a variety of cultural or ethnic groups within a society, organisation, or other context.
  • Cultural fluency – The ability to smoothly and effectively navigate cross-cultural interactions and understand cultural nuances and differences.
  • Cultural hegemony – The dominance of one cultural group over others, often through the imposition of its values, beliefs, and practices as the norm or standard for the entire society.
  • Cultural humility – A lifelong commitment to self-reflection and learning to understand and respect different cultures and experiences.
  • Cultural identity – An individual’s sense of belonging to a particular culture or group, often based on shared language, customs, values, and experiences.
  • Cultural imperialism – The imposition of a dominant culture’s values, beliefs, and practices on other cultures, often through economic, political, or media influence.
  • Cultural intelligence (CQ) – The capability to relate and work effectively in culturally diverse situations, based on cultural knowledge, skills, and abilities.
  • Cultural literacy – The ability to understand and appreciate the customs, values, and beliefs of different cultures, as well as the ability to effectively communicate and interact with people from diverse backgrounds.
  • Cultural misappropriation – The adoption or use of elements from a marginalised culture by members of a dominant culture without proper understanding, acknowledgement, or respect.
  • Cultural racism – A form of racism that relies on cultural differences rather than biological ones to justify discrimination and inequality.
  • Cultural relativism – The principle that an individual’s beliefs, values, and practices should be understood based on that person’s own culture rather than be judged against the criteria of another.
  • Cultural responsiveness – The ability to learn from and relate respectfully with people of diverse cultures, languages, and backgrounds.
  • Culturally responsive evaluation – An approach to programme evaluation that takes into account the cultural context and experiences of the individuals and communities being served, and seeks to engage them as active partners in the evaluation process.
  • Cultural responsiveness framework – A set of principles and practices that guide individuals and organisations in effectively and respectfully engaging with people from diverse cultural backgrounds.
  • Cultural pluralism – A model of society in which different cultural groups coexist and maintain their unique identities while contributing to the larger society.
  • Culturally proficient leadership – The ability of leaders to effectively manage and leverage diversity within their organisations, fostering an inclusive and equitable environment that values and respects all individuals.
  • Cultural programming – Events, activities, and initiatives designed to celebrate, educate, and raise awareness about diverse cultures, traditions, and experiences within a community or organisation.
  • Cultural safety – An environment that is spiritually, socially, emotionally, and physically safe for people, where there is no assault, challenge, or denial of their identity, of who they are, and what they need.
  • Cultural schema – A mental framework that helps individuals organise and interpret information about a particular culture based on prior knowledge and experiences.
  • Cultural self-awareness – Recognising and understanding one’s own cultural background, values, and biases, and how they shape one’s worldview and interactions with others.
  • Cultural sensitivity – Being aware, understanding, and respectful of cultural differences and how they impact behaviour, communication, and interactions.
  • Cultural sensitivity in healthcare – The practice of delivering healthcare services in a manner that respects and responds to the cultural beliefs, practices, and linguistic needs of diverse patient populations.
  • Cultural sensitivity training – Educational programmes designed to help individuals develop an understanding of and respect for cultural differences, promote inclusivity, and reduce bias and discrimination.
  • Cultural stereotyping – Oversimplified or generalised beliefs about a particular cultural group, often leading to prejudice and discrimination.
  • Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) – Referring to individuals or communities with diverse languages, ethnic backgrounds, nationalities, traditions, societal structures, and religions.
  • Culturally inclusive curriculum – An educational approach that incorporates diverse perspectives, histories, and experiences into the learning materials and activities to ensure all students feel represented and valued.
  • Culturally relevant pedagogy – A teaching approach that emphasises the importance of incorporating students’ cultural backgrounds, experiences, and reference points into the learning process to make education more engaging, meaningful, and effective.
  • Culturally sustaining pedagogy – A teaching approach that seeks to perpetuate and foster linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism as part of the democratic project of schooling and as a response to demographic and social change.
  • Cultural taxation – The burden placed on individuals from underrepresented groups to serve as representatives or experts on issues related to diversity, often without additional compensation or recognition.
  • Culturally situated design tools – Digital and physical tools that help learners connect computing and other STEM fields with their cultural heritage, empowering them to create artefacts that reflect and sustain their identities.
  • Curb cut effect – The phenomenon where accommodations made for individuals with disabilities or underrepresented groups often end up benefiting a much larger population.

Be impressively well informed

Get the very latest research intelligence briefings, video research briefings, infographics and more sent direct to you as they are published

Be the most impressively well-informed and up-to-date person around...

Powered by ConvertKit
Like what you see? Help us spread the word
>